Beauty

Organic beauty or green beauty?

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Alongside organic brands, more and more ranges are evolving towards a "green spirit", giving pride of place to natural ingredients. Which trend do you prefer? Both because each contains treasures.

Ariane Le Febvre

In the United States, cosmetics shelves already display: " How green do you want to be ?" ("Which green consumer do you want to be?"), Perfectly reflecting the evolution of consumer trends and the different nuances that range from intense green bio to pale green natural. " It's the future. Everyone has to adjust their slider according to their convictions, "thinks Mathilde Thomas, founder of Caudalie, between the" bio-addicts "of the first hour and the" neo-bio "more fickle that jump from one brand to another, Today, there are enough answers to refine our choices.

On the one hand, certified organic products, framed by labels, and on the other, "green" brands that give pride of place to natural ingredients (more than 50% of their formula) and remove unwanted (parabens, phenoxyethanol, silicones, mineral oils, polyethylene glycol, dyes, etc.), without prohibiting some synthetic substances to obtain textures and perfumes more This is the case of Caudalie, Ren, Korres, Aveda, Listen to your nature! by Yannick Noah, Cinq Mondes, Aesop ... And even if there is still some regulatory vagueness, these "clean" and sensory cosmetics are also seductive.

So should we choose e to be organic and natural? That would be a pity. Both of them contain treasures. "The two trends coexist, says √Člisabeth Araujo, International Director General of Sanoflore, consumers want above all products that preserve their health, concerns about the environment are far behind. Pregnant women, particularly attentive, are turning to organic, but as soon as a wrinkle occurs, they do not hesitate to return to traditional cosmetics if they deem it more effective. One thing is certain, organic influences largely conventional cosmetics, forced to evolve in turn. Parabens have been removed from most formulas, and it is now the turn of silicones to disappear from our shampoos. Consumers are demanding greater transparency as phytosanitary scandals have become highly suspicious.

In 2011, a single set of specifications

The multiplicity of labels had sowed a great shambles in people's minds. The new European standard, Cosmos (Cosmetic Organic Standard), should bring everyone together, harmonizing the German (BDIH), French (Cosmebio, Ecocert Greenlife and Qualité France), Italian (ICEA) and British (Soil Association) labels.In total, more than one thousand and four hundred manufacturers, or twenty-four thousand products, will adopt a unique set of specifications (to be consulted on www.cosmos-standard.org). Cosmos divides the products into two certified categories: "Natural" and "Organic", with, for the latter, a percentage of organic ingredients revised upward (it goes from 10% to 20%). Ultimately, all will be 100% natural or naturally occurring ingredients (ie, processed by authorized physical or chemical processes). No synthetic ingredients will be allowed, and water will no longer be part of the percentage of organic ingredients. Cosmos distinguishes five categories of ingredients: water (source, sea, distilled, obtained by osmosis ...); ingredients of mineral origin; agricultural ingredients obtained by physical processes; agricultural ingredients obtained by chemical processes (biofermentations, green chemistry ...); the other ingredients (marine ...).

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